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Thread: 2014 60" LCD Shootout: Vizio, Sharp & Samsung

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    Default 2014 60" LCD Shootout: Vizio, Sharp & Samsung

    werthliving.com

    With no intention of ever doing something as involved as this, I wound up doing a three set 'shootout' of 60" sets from Vizio, Sharp & Samsung.
    I was coming from a Mits 57" DLP from 2007, so it was an adjustment, not just size, but technology. Knowing most of, but not all of the differences between the two and spending weeks researching models I thought I had the ideal choice. Unfortunately I was wrong three times. With both the Vizios and the Sharps. I was dead certain on either the 60" or 55" Vizio. I thought it was almost a 'done deal'. Wrong.

    I really didn't have a 2nd choice at the time so I restarted my research. I ruled out Sony & Goldstar (LG) for a number of reasons. Sharp looked promising even though they were edge lit and not as popular. I always knew uniformity & viewing angles were critical along with black levels. Something most LCD sets fail or partial fail in at least one of the three. It wasn't until I discovered the "Sharp Black Hole". Yes, I made that up, but no I'm not kidding. I really liked this sets interface, especially with the additional inputs, but that went by the wayside.

    After the 2nd major letdown, I succumbed to Samsung. Below are my reviews of the four models (or should I say 3 1/2?). I counted one each for the Vizios since they had different panels. Also included are links to outside reviews and screen shots of the Sharp problems in the following posts.

    Attached is a photo of the setup for the comparison. You will be surprised how nice it is to do a real side by side comparison in a controlled environment, unlike what you find in a retail store which is a lost cause for the most part for any real testing. There is no fooling when it comes down to spotting differences, especially in detail (which is the first I look for). One thing you can't do is uniformity and viewing angle observations. The material is usually way too vivid (intentionally), the scenes are way too short and the lighting is way too bright.
    The three sets (from left to right; Vizio, Sharp, then Samsung) were as close to equal viewing distance (12') as I could make it though the Vizio & the Samsung were 1 foot closer). They were all fed with the same signal; OTA antenna for the tuners, a DVR & DVD player and my Sencore VP-403C ATSC/HDTV signal generator. Having a signal generator is great since differences in optical playback equipment will vary. It's also a lot easier to operate, no annoying DVD menus to deal with.The DVD test disc was DVE (no Blu Ray at the time). The HDMI feed was through a small DA (distribution amp, splitter if you prefer).

    The sets were adjusted for regular evening viewing with a single table lamp (off the photo to the left). Most of he 'gimmicks' were turned off (like most here do anyway).
    BTW; those folding tables were not of the usual fair. Strongest ones I have ever seen. I tested the capacity with mostly of my weight before I placed the sets on them. (I wouldn't put a Plasma on them though.) I had to use two for that Samsung due to their spider legged stand which I got rid of by making my own.
    .
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  2. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to videobruce For This Useful Post:

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    Default Re: 2014 60" LCD Shootout: Vizio, Sharp & Samsung

    This review is for the M60" B3 model with the common VA type panel. Below is for the M55 with the IPS panel.

    Other than the size, which is very noticeable especially when you have gotten use to a 60" set to drop 5". The difference between the VA & IPS panels are a subject in itself. With the local dimming it did make up for the lack of deeper blacks. Viewing angle is no contest, these VA panels are poor. Period. Move 10 degrees off center and see the difference (in a light controlled room during darker scenes. Sports and any vivid material, you really have to move off axis to see the shift. But there is more.
    Unknown to me at the time, VA panels have a faster response time and I don't mean gaming. There is less pronounced ghosting with the 60" vs the 55". Also, there is a increase in detail over the IPS panel.

    PROS:
    1. FALD (Full Array Local Dimming). Not a edge lit panel that usually suffers from flashlighting and uniformity issues (but see below),
    2. US based support (South Dakota). No worry about trying to converse with someone from who knows where,
    3. Above average uniformity (at least with this set). Very little SDE and/or hot spots,
    4. One half to one third the power consumption than other manufactures with no hit on panel output. Panel throws less heat also,
    5. Higher panel panel output (brightness) and more room to spare than other sets,
    6. Direct input selection (with an optional programmable remote). No more cycling through the input list to use another device. This is a huge plus.
    7. Fast boot up (7 seconds) and fast channel changing unlike many other tuners,
    8. Ability to skip the channel search and add channels later without doing a full scan thus preventing unwanted stations to be skipped in the channel list.
    9. Generous advanced picture adjustments, (but no gamma adjustment),
    10. Analog audio outs (separate L & R phono jacks) for conventional analog stereo receivers,
    11. Ability to add, create & rename custom picture modes instead of relying on the stock modes, most of which are useless just klike all other manufactures,
    12. No unwanted 3D or other so called questionable 'features'
    13. Sturdier stand base than with the 55" model. Only a slight amount of flexing,
    14. Decent owners manual unlike Samsungs' sprawled out 225 page joke of a manual.

    CONS:
    1. Slightly lower detail level compared to other manufactures (but can be partially equalized by bumping the sharpness up). Observed by doing a side by side comparison with the same size Sharp & Samsung sets.
    2. Much lower detail level using the internal tuner. I have noticed this many times comparing this to other manufactures sets in stores. Closeups a faces, fine textured clothing & grass are examples,
    3. These show mosquito noise from over-compressed DVDs' more so that other manufactures sets,
    4. Local dimming will cause some 'odd effects' which are usually just noticed during 'dark scenes" (nighttime shots and dimly lit indoor scenes). This has been exaggerated by many of these user reports here and elsewhere,
    5. With a VA panel you have the typical narrow viewing angle. Sharp for one is worse than this.
    6. Small remote, small buttons, small text that is hard to read, especially on the back side with the keyboard. The main side is not lighted which adds to the problems, but the keyboard side is. Where is the logic there? Then add a short timeout of the backlight (3 seconds). If you aren't a typist, forget it unless you have decent lighting.
    7. Very narrow IR windows on the remote and on the set. Remote has to be aimed almost directly at the TV. Same goes for at least some 3rd party programmable/learning remotes.
    8. The only function available on the set itself is power and input selection and it's hard to find like Samsungs' and apparently many others. No volume, channel and most important NO menu access. If your remote and/or IR receiver goes south you are out of luck, Bad place to cut corners,
    9. One combined composite/component shared input (not uncommon now days). Another bad idea to 'cut corners'. Many still have legacy equipment that need both types. At least provide one of each.
    10. The tuner signal level/condition indicator is buried under "System Info" instead of being available in the 'Info Bar' as it is for the WiFi connection and many other sets.
    11. Firmware updates are fully automatic which sounds good on paper, but there is no notice that you are getting one and no easy way to stop it from happening. It is well known that firmware updates can cause new problems. Real bad idea. At least give the owner a choice of manual or auto updates.
    12. Slightly higher power consumption than some others, 160 watts with full backlightl, 80-120 watts in normal operation depending on settings). Surely not a Plasma or a 4k set. (Yes, these 4k sets are the new power hogs).
    13. The stand has to be completely assembled to the set first before placing it on the table. With other sets, their stand allows the panel to be lowered into place, then the screws are inserted. A far better design.
    14. The gray/silver plastic cover to that stand is cheap looking and distracting as is that trim piece around the bezel. The stand should not be distracting (stand out) visually.

    .
    Comments;
    1. Some of these 'Cons' can, or should be fairly easy to fix. Many are just not fully thought out when these were designed.
    2. From reading reviews over at Amazon (taken with a grain of salt of course), part of the problem with damaged Vizio sets is the lack of depth to their boxes, especially on the bottom. There is insufficient packaging material protecting the panel and the frame. I was able to compare this set with a 60" Sharp that were both boxed, on the floor of a local retailer. The Sharp was much larger. More so than just being a larger panel. It looked like it was a 65" set, not 60". They have much thicker Styrofoam inserts than Vizio uses. Samsung has similar sized cartons, though actually thinner which was a surprise.
    3. Reports of problems over at Amazon using wireless Ethernet, I had no problem with connectivity. My router is only 15-20' away thru a wall and a wide 'furnace' (interior) chimney. I had no intention of using wireless due to reception issues, slower throughput and the hassle of security, I just wanted to try it. Running a Cat5e (or Cat6) cable usually isn't a big deal (if you have reasonably abilities). You never have to worry about interference of security issues.
    I can't believe some actually returned their set just because of WiFi problems.

    .

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    Default Re: 2014 60" LCD Shootout: Vizio, Sharp & Samsung

    Vizio M602i-B2


    This review is for the M60" B3 model with the common VA type panel. Below is for the M55 with the IPS panel.

    Other than the size, which is very noticeable especially when you have gotten use to a 60" set to drop 5". The difference between the VA & IPS panels are a subject in itself. With the local dimming it did make up for the lack of deeper blacks. Viewing angle is no contest, these VA panels are poor. Period. Move 10 degrees off center and see the difference (in a light controlled room during darker scenes. Sports and any vivid material, you really have to move off axis to see the shift. But there is more.
    Unknown to me at the time, VA panels have a faster response time and I don't mean gaming. There is less pronounced ghosting with the 60" vs the 55". Also, there is a increase in detail over the IPS panel.

    PROS:
    1. FALD (Full Array Local Dimming). Not a edge lit panel that usually suffers from flashlighting and uniformity issues (but see below),
    2. US based support (South Dakota). No worry about trying to converse with someone from who knows where,
    3. Above average uniformity (at least with this set). Very little SDE and/or hot spots,
    4. One half to one third the power consumption than other manufactures with no hit on panel output. Panel throws less heat also,
    5. Higher panel panel output (brightness) and more room to spare than other sets,
    6. Direct input selection (with an optional programmable remote). No more cycling through the input list to use another device. This is a huge plus.
    7. Fast boot up (7 seconds) and fast channel changing unlike many other tuners,
    8. Ability to skip the channel search and add channels later without doing a full scan thus preventing unwanted stations to be skipped in the channel list.
    9. Generous advanced picture adjustments, (but no gamma adjustment),
    10. Analog audio outs (separate L & R phono jacks) for conventional analog stereo receivers,
    11. Ability to add, create & rename custom picture modes instead of relying on the stock modes, most of which are useless just klike all other manufactures,
    12. No unwanted 3D or other so called questionable 'features'
    13. Sturdier stand base than with the 55" model. Only a slight amount of flexing,
    14. Decent owners manual unlike Samsungs' sprawled out 225 page joke of a manual.

    CONS:
    1. Slightly lower detail level compared to other manufactures (but can be partially equalized by bumping the sharpness up). Observed by doing a side by side comparison with the same size Sharp & Samsung sets.
    2. Much lower detail level using the internal tuner. I have noticed this many times comparing this to other manufactures sets in stores. Closeups a faces, fine textured clothing & grass are examples,
    3. These show mosquito noise from over-compressed DVDs' more so that other manufactures sets,
    4. Local dimming will cause some 'odd effects' which are usually just noticed during 'dark scenes" (nighttime shots and dimly lit indoor scenes). This has been exaggerated by many of these user reports here and elsewhere,
    5. With a VA panel you have the typical narrow viewing angle. Sharp for one is worse than this.
    6. Small remote, small buttons, small text that is hard to read, especially on the back side with the keyboard. The main side is not lighted which adds to the problems, but the keyboard side is. Where is the logic there? Then add a short timeout of the backlight (3 seconds). If you aren't a typist, forget it unless you have decent lighting.
    7. Very narrow IR windows on the remote and on the set. Remote has to be aimed almost directly at the TV. Same goes for at least some 3rd party programmable/learning remotes.
    8. The only function available on the set itself is power and input selection and it's hard to find like Samsungs' and apparently many others. No volume, channel and most important NO menu access. If your remote and/or IR receiver goes south you are out of luck, Bad place to cut corners,
    9. One combined composite/component shared input (not uncommon now days). Another bad idea to 'cut corners'. Many still have legacy equipment that need both types. At least provide one of each.
    10. The tuner signal level/condition indicator is buried under "System Info" instead of being available in the 'Info Bar' as it is for the WiFi connection and many other sets.
    11. Firmware updates are fully automatic which sounds good on paper, but there is no notice that you are getting one and no easy way to stop it from happening. It is well known that firmware updates can cause new problems. Real bad idea. At least give the owner a choice of manual or auto updates.
    12. Slightly higher power consumption than some others, 160 watts with full backlightl, 80-120 watts in normal operation depending on settings). Surely not a Plasma or a 4k set. (Yes, these 4k sets are the new power hogs).
    13. The stand has to be completely assembled to the set first before placing it on the table. With other sets, their stand allows the panel to be lowered into place, then the screws are inserted. A far better design.
    14. The gray/silver plastic cover to that stand is cheap looking and distracting as is that trim piece around the bezel. The stand should not be distracting (stand out) visually.

    .
    Comments;
    1. Some of these 'Cons' can, or should be fairly easy to fix. Many are just not fully thought out when these were designed.
    2. From reading reviews over at Amazon (taken with a grain of salt of course), part of the problem with damaged Vizio sets is the lack of depth to their boxes, especially on the bottom. There is insufficient packaging material protecting the panel and the frame. I was able to compare this set with a 60" Sharp that were both boxed, on the floor of a local retailer. The Sharp was much larger. More so than just being a larger panel. It looked like it was a 65" set, not 60". They have much thicker Styrofoam inserts than Vizio uses. Samsung has similar sized cartons, though actually thinner which was a surprise.
    3. Reports of problems over at Amazon using wireless Ethernet, I had no problem with connectivity. My router is only 15-20' away thru a wall and a wide 'furnace' (interior) chimney. I had no intention of using wireless due to reception issues, slower throughput and the hassle of security, I just wanted to try it. Running a Cat5e (or Cat6) cable usually isn't a big deal (if you have reasonably abilities). You never have to worry about interference of security issues.
    I can't believe some actually returned their set just because of WiFi problems.

    .

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    Default Re: 2014 60" LCD Shootout: Vizio, Sharp & Samsung

    Instead of repeating 90% of the above, below are the key differences.
    The full review is here (post 2152);
    http://www.avsforum.com/forum/166-lc...l#post28819450

    PROS:
    1. Much wider viewing angles with IPS panel over VA,
    2. Less color shift.

    CONS:
    1. The fine detail issue is slightly worse with IPS panels apparently. I have had this confirmed elsewhere, there is a drop in detail quality.
    2. There is also an increase in image trails (ghosting) with IPS panels. Also confirmed elsewhere, neither of which I was aware of. This is mostly noticeable during darker scenes,
    3. Without the local dimming on, black levels will suffer with a IPS panel. But at least you don't have to be glued to one "sweet spot" with a VA panel.
    4. Poor stand. The metal base that is used is too thin which causes forward & backwards rocking when bumped. It doesn't appear unsafe, but there is no reason for this. This is NOT the case with the 60" set even though the design is the same.
    5. Only available in the 47 & 55" sizes. (Correct me if I'm wrong)

    Comments;
    There has been much talk about the poorer blacks IPS panels have. While true, I feel it is well over exaggerated, especially if you have a FALD set and have it active. What gets me is most seem to be ok with the better 'blacks' that VA panels have, but are ok with the major shift in those black levels when you over off center as little as 5 degrees depending on what you are watching. I can easily see the difference looking a flat field below the 20 gray step level. True, that isn't a 'normal' viewing condition, but it's still relevant since movies & weekly dramas are full of those type lighting conditions.

    Mind you, viewing bright, well lit scenes and of course sports, this is a non issue. In fact, with 'vivid' program material, you can easily shift over 45 degrees off axis and can't see the difference. If you aren't aware of the site, take a look here for videos of the change in display quality as the set rotates up to 90 degrees;
    http://www.rtings.com/info/viewing-angle-tvs

    These tests are recorded with the set on a custom designed 'turntable' to show the changes off axis viewing has on different sets. Completely unique among all of the 'review' sites. Please note, there are a few exceptions to the way the shots are grouped starting with the first entry. The entry with the widest angle only refers to the 55" version, not the 60 or 65". This is mentioned in the text of the individual tests themselves, but it is clear here. I have brought attention to this to the sites owner. He will be making changes in the sites layout for next year. Same goes with the type of tests he will be preforming.

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    Default Re: 2014 60" LCD Shootout: Vizio, Sharp & Samsung

    Sharp LC-60EQ10U

    Sharp has five model series for their 2014 LCD sets (note; LCD not LED);
    LE, EQ, SQ & UQ series. The LE is a carryover from 2013 (it is a large step down from this model).

    Not too many would try a third, let alone a fourth sample, but I did in the hopes the 4th was the winner. But, I lost again.
    The 1st was the worst, by far. A dark area in the middle half of the panel. The 2nd & third better, but still bad with similar dark and light areas. The 4th was the best, but it still was not acceptable.
    There is a obvious pattern to the uniformity issues. On all four, the center is the darkest and the rest varies widely. One has a hot spot in the upper right, another, the opposite corner; bottom left.

    Not wanting to give up, I decided to try a SQ model which uses a slightly different panel. I wasn't interested in the extra so called 'features' and gimmicks, but just reasonably even uniformity. Well, it was better, actually the best of the bunch, but that was offset with a quirk in their "Resolution Enhance" settings.
    When you switched from the default "Mode 1" to off, the gray scale shifted to a distinct greenish yellow. Apparently the set was aligned in that mode since it was mostly correct. Switching to Mode 2 cause no change, but turning that 'gimmick' (I took a close look at the differences on and off; (it basically is a edge enhancement setting in spite of what the hype says viewing static test patterns). Off clearly showed the problem

    I did contact Sharp this time which was a positive experience. Their support for the larger sets is separate from the smaller models and it appears the support is in the US. After the 1st call, I received a call back the next day which I wasn't expecting looking for more details. I did send in numerous screen shots of both this problem and their panel problems (all sets). After the 2nd contact I had an e-mail and a call asking what I would like done. It was too late, the last set already went back since the time limit on the set I wound up keeping expired. It was more than obvious, this would not fly, even if this other quirk would be 'fixed'.

    The odd thing about all of this is, Samsung uses Sharp panels on many of their models and on their 6350 model I wound up getting, it has almost no issues with poor uniformity. One reason may be that model uses direct lit (full array) vs edge lit. That and/or Sharps QC standards are far lower with their own sets.


    Pros;
    1. Detail level and motion handling rivals Samsung,
    2. Inputs; 4 HDMI, 2 composite, 1 component NONE SHARED! The only line of LCD sets that has this that I know of, just about all the others have the lame, single shared composite/component setup. Needed for legacy equipment, CCTV cameras and it also give your a 5th HD input (though analog).
    3. Ability with an optional programmable remote for direct input selection. No more jumping through inputs to get to the device you want to use.
    4. Sturdy base. The panel slides in from the top unlike many where you have to screw it together before you stand it up. Far better than Vizio & Samsungs' design,
    5. No 3D or other questionable, so called features including that 4k input ability on a 1080 set,
    6. Manual firmware updating. You choose if you want the update or not. Far better than it automatically happening without your knowledge. Also, I believe with files from their website you should be able to revert back if there is a issue.
    7. Fairly easy access to the picture adjustments menu, though it could of been better with a single button shortcut.
    8. Service literature is available, unlike some other importers where the manual isn't even available to 3rd party service shops. How can you fix something properly w/o a service manual? To the importers that don't offer one; what are you hiding? This is a nice plus,
    9. Decent sized owners manual (downloaded from their website, not supplied), though it could of been composed better, combining pages to reduce the overall number,
    10. Full menu functions are available on the set itself (backup if the remote or IR receiver goes south), not just power, volume & channel change, unlike Vizio, (note; the 2015 models apparently will not have this)
    11. Ability to add channels without doing a scan. Saves time, eliminates removing unwanted channels in your channel list later on,
    12. Separate US based support for sets 60" and above along with call backs the next day. A real nice surprise here.
    13. Well packaged, wider box than others. Nylon straps securing the bottom to the top (instead of those plastic 'clips' that are inserted through the upper carton) making it easier to carry.

    Cons;
    1. Screen uniformity is the deal breaker. (see photos)
    2. Edge lit, more chance of flashlighting and 'hot spots' over a back lit panel though in spite of the other defects, that hasn't been the problem with the four sets I have had,
    3. Between two and three times the current draw than the M60 Vizio,
    4. Limited light output. Darker than other manufactures sets even at the highest settings. The warmest color temperature drops the output even more,
    5. Unnecessary picture modes. Why do we need two 'Vivid' settings. No ability to rename modes or bypass ones not used,
    6. Slow boot time (17 seconds) and slightly slow channel changing.
    7. Buried channel signal level indication. Why it's not in the info bar is beyond me,
    8. When you are in a input other than 'TV', accidentally hitting the channel up or down automatically switches to the tuner input,
    9. Menu times out too quickly. Annoying when you are doing picture adjustments,
    10. That wasteful "wallpaper mode" "quick on" function defeats the concept of energy saving. Consumption is around 45 watts, even more of a waste if no one is there to see it. (yes, you don't have to use, it but it's the principle of this 'gimmick' which is counterproductive)
    11. Non lighted remote (I use a learning/programmable remote, so it's not a issue),
    12. Note sure this can really be called a negative, but Sharp is not one of the more popular names here.

    13. On the SQ model a quirk in the Resolution Enhance setting. Switching it 'off' caused the gray scale to shift to a greenish-yellow tint. Upon closer inspection of numerous patterns and program, there was no improvement with this so called feature, only a increase in edge enhancement. That can always be done using the sharpness control.

    Believe me, I realty wanted this to be the choice after the major disappointment with Vizio. Unlike so many here that don't even try a 2nd set. (Real stupidity there). At least give the manufacture/importer a 2nd chance. These are mass produced consumer products. There will be differences and defective unit sold. Two, maybe, just maybe three bad ones? But, six? Sorry, that is neither bad luck nor is it a coincidence.
    Even if the uniformity was not a issue, the viewing angle was worse than Vizio & Samsung running VA panels.

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    Default Re: 2014 60" LCD Shootout: Vizio, Sharp & Samsung

    Samsung UN60H6350

    It's a sorry state when corporations have go out of their way to deceive the buying public. This is the misleading and just incorrect use of the term "LED TV" when in fact these are still LCD TV's, just with LED backlighting. Can't they market their sets just based on features, not trying to claim its a different item all together? Now if they would of just stated "LCD TV with LED backlighting", it would not be deceiving since it was factual. This isn't any different than using terms like "digital cables" or "digital speakers". So much so it started a uproar in the UK a few years ago.
    Anyone that supports this is no better then they are, as it opens the door to other deceitful practices if there aren't enough as there is.

    Having said that, this review is for the 6350 series which is the highest model without 3D and that smart remote (which I surely didn't want).

    Pros;
    1. High detail level and motion handling than some of the others,
    2. No so called "smart remote" that you have to wave around to attempt to access any of the sets functions, (I didn't know the wheel needed reinventing)
    3. No upscaling to 4k or 3D features which are highly debatable in the 1st place,
    4. Direct lit panel (full array),
    5. No flashlighting or uniformity issues except one in the lower left corner that was barely noticeable with this sample. (VA panel from Sharp),
    6. Fast boot time (five seconds) and fairly fast channel changes,
    7. Ability to add channels without doing a 'scan' by just directly entering the whole physical channel number in outside the menu. A time saver and it eliminates going back and removing unwanted channels from the list,
    8. Highly customizable picture controls including advanced CMS settings not input dependable unless you want them to be,
    9. Four HDMI inputs,
    10. PIP option. This was a major surprise since I have read nothing about this. Since all of these so called test reviews that don't even acknowledge the existence of a internal tuner, there was no mention of this there either.

    Cons;
    1. Overly complex Internet layout. Overwhelming.
    2. You have to setup an account to just use all the Internet features. What, register to use the TV??
    3. Overly lengthy, complicated agreement that has to be acknowledged to create this account. I wonder just how many attorneys it took to compile this? 48 pages for the main agreement and another 29 pages for another. Of course 95% will just check it off having no clue what they are agreeing to,
    4. Much higher power consumption which is surprising considering this is edge lit. Maxes out at 167 watts and averages around 130-150 watts. Though it's no where near what these 4k sets draw (the new power hogs),
    5. Narrow viewing angle as it is with all VA panels,
    6. Excessively large menu boxes. Especially annoying when one is trying to adjust picture settings. How can you see the result when up to 3/4 of the screen is covered with a menu box?? Even the basic picture settings, the somewhat smaller long narrow box is still excessive. Menu needs improvement for access to certain picture controls (at least you don't have to point, wave your hand around or talk to the TV ) They need to take a lesson from Vizio,
    7. Ridiculous large owners manual of 225 pages that has to be downloaded from their web site. This could of easily been cut in half by combining pages, half of which are not fully used. It's just too overwhelming to be user friendly while missing on many details in spite of it's size. There is a "e-manual", but I don't see that as a real advantage. What, turn the TV on to read how it works?
    8. Ugly, distracting highly reflective plastic covered four legged stand. As bad as that, it's flimsy. The panel can rock front and back and side to side. Worse than the 55" Vizio.
    9. Panel lottery. Do you feel lucky?
    10. A limited number of preset picture modes of which only one is close to being accurate,
    11. No ability to create or rename any of the above,
    12. Only a single, hidden 'joystick' button for the power, input and a couple of other functions. Another bad trend,
    13. The remote is small considering the number of buttons which could be reduced. It is backlight though,
    14. Packaging is thiner than other sized sets. Thinner than Vizios; that appears to have a higher number of set that are received damage according to reviews over at Amazon. Also, Samsung uses those cheap plastic 'clips' instead of using nylon straps that encircle the box that Sharp uses.

    15. This may or may not be a 'fluke', but on numerous occasions the picture mode and the settings themselves have changed after leaving that input, then returning later. I have not seen a pattern to this. (I do not have it set for all inputs when making adjustments.)
    16. It also appears the tuners channel list will not keep a deleted 'audio only' sub channel deleted. It keeps on returning.

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    Default Re: 2014 60" LCD Shootout: Vizio, Sharp & Samsung

    Outside links for reviews; (you many have to add www for the prefix)


    Vizio;

    cnet.com/products/vizio-m602i-b3/
    televisions.reviewed.com/cont...-led-tv-review
    soundandvision.com/conten...b3-lcdled-hdtv
    rtings.com/reviews/tv/lcd-led/vizio/m-series
    rtings.com/reviews/tv/lcd-led/vizio/m-series
    rtings.com/reviews/tv/lcd-led/vizio/e-series
    pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2457369,00.asp
    hometheaterreview.com/vizio-m...hdtv-reviewed/
    reviews.lcdtvbuyingguide.com/...zio-m602i.html
    reviews.lcdtvbuyingguide.com/...zio-m552i.html (IPS panel w/ poor viewing angles?)
    hdtvsolutions.com/VIZIO-M...-TV-Review.htm


    Sharp;

    digitaltrends.com/tv-revi...0uq17u-review/
    televisions.reviewed.com/cont...-led-tv-review
    televisions.reviewed.com/cont...-led-tv-review
    televisions.reviewed.com/cont...-led-tv-review
    soundandvision.com/conten...7u-3d-lcd-hdtv
    pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2457690,00.asp
    pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2418541,00.asp
    hometheaterreview.com/sharp-l...hdtv-reviewed/
    reviews.lcdtvbuyingguide.com/...lc60eq10u.html
    reviews.lcdtvbuyingguide.com/...lc60sq15u.html
    reviews.lcdtvbuyingguide.com/...lc60uq17u.html
    cnet.com/products/sharp-lc-60uq17u/


    Samsung:

    cnet.com/products/samsung-un60h6350/
    cnet.com/products/samsung-un60h6400/
    televisions.reviewed.com/cont...50h6350-review
    televisions.reviewed.com/cont...-led-tv-review
    rtings.com/reviews/tv/lcd-led/samsung/h6350
    rtings.com/reviews/tv/lcd-led/samsung/h6400
    .rtings.com/reviews/tv/lcd-led/samsung/h6203
    pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2458718,00.asp
    pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2424153,00.asp
    reviews.lcdtvbuyingguide.com/...un65h6350.html
    hdtvtest.co.uk/news/ue48h...1411133951.htm (European)

  9. #8
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    Default Re: 2014 60" LCD Shootout: Vizio, Sharp & Samsung


    Edge lit vs FA (Full Array) backlighting uniformity issues;

    I wanted to use a separate post to show these screen shots of what I am now calling "Sharps Black Hole". When I first saw the problem I didn't know what was going on. It was so severe, it was unwatchable (at lest for me.). The 4th set was almost as bad.
    Taking a closer look at the Samsung (the one I wound up with) I saw a similar effect, but to a much. much lesser degree. In fact if I wasn't looking for it I would not of noticed.

    Viewing most any of these VA LCD panels closer than what would be normal or recommended you will see a darker area in the center similar to these screen shots, but no way as bad. I didn't do this on the 55" Vizio IPS unfortunately, since it was already sent back so I don't know how that would of looked. This clearly reflects the very limited viewing angle. One reason it shows worse on these Sharps is the viewing angle is slightly narrower than most of the others.

    There is a great site for seeing what I'm talking about if you don't already know. I already provided numerous links in the previous post.
    For their 'viewing angle' tests, go here;
    http://www.rtings.com/info/viewing-angle-tvs

    The Vizio "M" model that was tested was the 55" IPS, not the 60", hence it had the widest viewing angle. (I have discussed that with him.)

    I used a Sencore VP-403C HDTV/ATSC signal generator to produce a full frame, flat field. I used levels from 0 to 10 IRE for the tests since that is where the problems shows the easiest. The higher you raise the level, the problem usually diminishes above 40-50 IRE. Settings were left at viewing levels for a light controlled room, not home theater, but somewhat subdued living room lighting. Bright enough to read next to a table lamp. The problem would be much worse if it was darker. Note, I was dead center for all shots and at the same distance as I would be when viewing (around 12').
    I tried to be as consistent as possible between camera shots.

    I did contact Sharp twice and had two return phone calls and three return e-mails which was a pleasant surprise. That and having the benefit of a separate support group for their large screen sets apparently based in the US was even more of a surprise. I did send these photos in to them and was told they would be forwarded to "management". I will give credit to what I would consider above average customer support from Sharp.

    How can you NOT see this?? It was suggested that the problem be covered up by using some of the automatic features (gimmicks) that most turn off, but that would be no fix since all you would be doing is 'sweeping the dirt under the rug'.

    The first two are Vizio FALD, the 3rd is a Samsung, all the others are Sharp edge lit sets. Very easy to tell the difference with the Sharps.
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